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Francis Fukuyama

Francis Fukuyama

Francis Fukuyama is chairman of the editorial board of American Purpose.

Fukuyama is Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow and director of the Ford Dorsey Master’s in International Policy program at Stanford University’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies.

Fukuyama’s most recent book is Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment (2018). His forthcoming book is entitled Liberalism and Its Discontents, building off his American Purpose foundational article of the same name.

His two-volume analysis of political order—The Origins of Political Order and Political Order and Political Decay—appeared in 2011 and 2014. Other books include Our Posthuman Future (2000), The Great Disruption (1999), and Trust (1995).

His book The End of History and the Last Man (1992) has appeared in over twenty foreign editions.

Articles and Events

What Is Liberalism?

What Is Liberalism?

Today marks the publication of my new book, Liberalism and Its Discontents, which you will be hearing more about in the coming days. It is published in North America by Farrar, Straus and Giroux and available on Amazon; it was published in the United Kingdom by Profile Books in late

Francis Fukuyama
Why Ukraine Will Win

Why Ukraine Will Win

Back on March 10, I posted “Preparing for Defeat,” in which I argued that Russia might be heading for outright defeat in its invasion of Ukraine. It got a lot of attention at the time and many people thought that I was being wildly optimistic. So far, the broad thrust

Francis Fukuyama
Systemic Errors

Systemic Errors

Over the past few weeks, we have been treated to two major examples of disastrous decision-making by authoritarian great powers. The first was, clearly, the Russian invasion of Ukraine, which to date has killed tens of thousands of innocent Ukrainian civilians. The cost to Russia has been enormous as well,

Francis Fukuyama
Ukraine’s Economic War

Ukraine’s Economic War

Since my relatively optimistic post of March 10, nothing has happened that fundamentally contradicts the analysis. Media coverage of the war has began to acknowledge the significant gains made by Ukrainian forces a week ago, and now the Russians are clearly pulling out from the area around Kyiv. You don’

Francis Fukuyama

German Foreign Policy and European Reactions to Ukraine with Johannes Ludewig

Johannes Ludewig, a current visiting scholar at CDDRL, is a senior German government official who played a major role in German unification. In this episode, he joins Francis Fukuyama to reflect on the European reaction to the current crisis in Ukraine, as well as the leadership qualities that made unification

Francis Fukuyama
Helping Ukraine, Part II

Helping Ukraine, Part II

My Ukrainian friends continue to be upset about my failure to endorse a no-fly zone over Ukraine. As I explained in my last post, the reason I am opposed is that it would necessarily involve NATO forces directly attacking Russian targets on Russian territory, with all of the dangers of

Francis Fukuyama
Helping Ukraine

Helping Ukraine

My last post has upset many of my Ukrainian friends because I argued that the Biden administration was correct in not transferring Polish MiGs to Kyiv and in not implementing a no-fly zone. Let me explain the logic behind this in greater detail. The Polish MiGs were a big distraction

Francis Fukuyama
Preparing for Defeat

Preparing for Defeat

I’m writing this from Skopje, North Macedonia, where I’ve been for the last week teaching one of our Leadership Academy for Development courses. Following the Ukraine war is no different here in terms of available information, except that I’m in an adjacent time zone, and the fact

Francis Fukuyama