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Francis Fukuyama

Francis Fukuyama

Francis Fukuyama is chairman of the editorial board of American Purpose.

Fukuyama is Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow and director of the Ford Dorsey Master’s in International Policy program at Stanford University’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies.

Fukuyama’s most recent book is Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment (2018). His forthcoming book is entitled Liberalism and Its Discontents, building off his American Purpose foundational article of the same name.

His two-volume analysis of political order—The Origins of Political Order and Political Order and Political Decay—appeared in 2011 and 2014. Other books include Our Posthuman Future (2000), The Great Disruption (1999), and Trust (1995).

His book The End of History and the Last Man (1992) has appeared in over twenty foreign editions.

Articles and Events

Democratic Moldova

Democratic Moldova

I’m interrupting my series on Valuing the Deep State to talk about the Republic of Moldova, a country I visited last week as part of a Leadership Academy for Development teaching program. Moldova has been one of the bright spots seeing an advance of democratic institutions in recent years,

Francis Fukuyama
Valuing the Deep State Part II: The Origin of States

Valuing the Deep State Part II: The Origin of States

This is the second article in a series on bureaucratic autonomy; the first installment can be found here. My dissatisfaction with existing theories of political development in the early 2000s eventually led to the publication of my two volume series, The Origins of Political Order (2011) and Political Order and

Francis Fukuyama
Valuing the Deep State, Part I

Valuing the Deep State, Part I

I want to return to the issue that has been my central intellectual preoccupation over the past couple of decades, which is the autonomy of the modern state and its role in a democracy. The Republican Party has become a cult of personality in recent years, but behind the phenomenon

Francis Fukuyama
Ukraine's Ripples
Interview

Ukraine's Ripples

Robert Asahina speaks to Francis Fukuyama and Stuart Levey on the world-wide effects of Russia’s war against Ukraine.

Robert Asahina, Francis Fukuyama, Stuart Levey
First-Person View

First-Person View

I’ve been reluctant to write about my hobbies these past few months because so many momentous and terrible things were taking place in the world—not just the Ukraine war, but the deepening crisis of American democracy and the decline of liberal democracy worldwide. Nonetheless, there’s been a

Francis Fukuyama
Pathways from Polarization

Pathways from Polarization

Polarization—the sharp division of American society between red and blue—is the single greatest weakness of the United States as a country today. We face many challenges at present, over inflation, racial and gender inequality, crime, drug use, climate change, immigration, and the like, and all of these issues

Francis Fukuyama
A Ukrainian Turnaround?

A Ukrainian Turnaround?

There is accumulating evidence that the momentum in the Ukraine war has shifted quite dramatically to the Ukrainian side, and that we can expect big changes on the battlefield in the coming weeks. I’m continuing to be optimistic about Ukraine’s prospects, despite hand-wringing about the apparent stalemate on

Francis Fukuyama
Partisanship and Principle

Partisanship and Principle

There are many domains in which there is a strong norm of non-partisanship. The classic bureaucrat described by Max Weber is not a partisan, but rather a neutral technocrat whose role lies in expertly carrying out mandates provided by political leaders. Though politics always intrudes at some level, we do

Francis Fukuyama